The Oxford English dictionary declared word of the year. They became the “youthquake” – a noun that can be defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change caused by the actions or influence of youth.” It is reported online edition of N+1.

Traditionally, the word of the year Oxford Dictionaries selects, lexicographic division of Oxford University Press, the publishing Department of Oxford University.

The word “youthquake” is a combination of two words – youth (“youth”) and earthquake (“earthquake”). For the first time it was used by the editor in chief of Vogue magazine Diana Vreeland in the January issue of 1965, indicating the role of young people in cultural changes.

Increase in the use of the word “youthquake” throughout the year

In 2017, the popularity of the word increased five times compared to the previous year. It is actively used in June during the General elections in the UK, when young people voted with a huge margin over Jeremy Corbin, leader of the labour party. The second peak of the use of the “youthquake” has occurred in September, when they discussed the participation of young people in elections in New Zealand.

In the shortlist for the Oxford Dictionaries also came such words as “gorpcore” (Kochkor) – fashionable trend, the main value of which is recognized as a triumph of comfort over beauty, newsjacking – linking marketing messages to the immediate news about it, unicorn is the unicorn. With other words can be found on the website of Oxford University Press.

Last year the winner was the word “post-truth” – an adjective that is defined as “relating to such circumstances or for such circumstances in which objective facts influence the formation of public opinion less than appeals to emotions and personal opinions”. In 2015 word of the year by the Oxford dictionary for the first time was not a real word, and the icon Emoji is “face with tears of joy.”

August 27, 2015 the online version of the Oxford English dictionary has made more than a thousand neologisms.




The Oxford English dictionary declared “word of the year” 15.12.2017

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